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O ANO DE 2007 NOS QUADRINHOS.

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  • O ANO DE 2007 NOS QUADRINHOS.

    O IGN fez uma matéria bem legal sobre a retrospectiva 2007:

    http://comics.ign.com/articles/842/842892p1.html

    2007 Year in Review: Comics
    Civil War. Sinestro Corps. X-Men: Messiah Complex. Ra's Al Ghul. World War Hulk. Countdown. We look back on one crazy year.
    by Jesse Schedeen & Richard George


    December 20, 2007 - Welcome to IGN Comics' Year in Review for 2007. 2007 was definitely packed to the brim with announcements, revelations, and hearsay. We're here to help you make sense of it all. Besides looking back at a year's worth of news, we're providing links to our past articles so you can catch up on developments you wither missed or forgot about entirely. With any luck, this Year in Review might just leave you prepared for 2008. It's not going to be any less crazy than 2007 was.

    Like artwork? We have plenty of that here. We wanted to showcase some of the best covers, moments and concepts of the year. To that end we've assembled over 20 pieces, but keep in mind that they don't necessarily line up to whatever subject is directly being addressed in the text.

    Enjoy!
    The State of Comics


    Lately, it seems like every year is the best year in the history of comics until the next year rolls around. Our favorite funny books may not sell as well as they used to, but the level of craft put into each of our favorite books is nothing short of amazing. Surely a few deceased comic legends are spinning in their graves, but out of excitement for the industry more than any sort of zombie rage.

    As Frank Sinatra might have sung, 2007 was a very good year. Still, it may have bucked the trend by failing to outclass 2006. A number of major events at both the big two publishers proved a bit underwhelming to fans coming off their post-Civil War and 52 highs. It may not have been the best year ever, but it was still pretty darn good. Let's take a look back.

    DC Comics

    Coming into 2007, DC's biggest project was undoubtedly 52. This weekly series impressed readers every week with its twisting plots, fascinating portrayals of B and C-list characters, and a never ending slate of beautiful covers. As the months wore on we saw Animal Man, Starfire, and Adam Strange battle obstacle after obstacle in their journey home. Elongated Man's self-destructive quest fittingly ended in self destruction, but also in redemption. One Question was put to rest, while another took up the mantle. And Black Adam's rage proved to be the catalyst for World War III, the end of which saw the former king powerless and millions if innocents dead.

    DC wasted absolutely no time in capitalizing on the success of their weekly series. One week after 52 Week 52 hit the stands, Countdown #51 appeared to carry the torch. Unfortunately, things immediately started to turn sour. Though similar in concept, the less than likable cast of characters and unfocused plot structure turned many 52 readers off the project. An increasingly dense amount of tie-in projects only complicated matters further. The most notable of these projects was DC's first major event comic of the year, Amazons Attack. This story saw the Amazons wage war on the US, trashing all manner of national landmarks in the process. In the end, the series' main revelation only mattered to those still following along with Countdown.



    2006 was not a good year for DC's big three icons, as delays threatened to cripple their various comics in the wake of One Year Later. 2007 was an improvement then, as most have resumed a more or less regular schedule by now. Allan Heinberg's 5-issue Wonder Woman run was finally completed, and Gail Simone is quickly putting the book back on track. Working with new artists, Geoff Johns was able to recapture his readers' interest in Action Comics. While he barely heard from Grant Morrison's All-Star Superman this year, what few issues we saw easily ranked as the best of 2007. Even Batman fared quite well under Morrison's tenure, though a rotating cast on Detective Comics and the lackluster Resurrection of Ra's al Ghul crossover threatened to derail all that.

    As always, DC's Vertigo imprint proved to be quite the workhorse. In addition to returning favorites like Fables and DMZ, fans of mature comics were blown away by Jason Aaron's new series, Scalped. Even John Constantine did his part, as Hellblazer is suddenly the best it's been in years. It's too bad the same compliments can't be reserved for DC's other major imprint, Wildstorm. A botched relaunch attempt last year has so far given readers one issue of WildC.A.T.S. and two of The Authority. A number of side-projects and new series have struggled to fill the gap, but at times it feels as if Ex Machina is the imprint's only reason for existence.



    Strangely enough, DC's brightest shining light of 2007 proved to be Sinestro. Geoff Johns "Sinestro Corps War" storyline was easily the best DC event of the year. Frankly, it's the best thing they published in years. This event brought together one of the greatest casts of villains ever assembled, and in the process it redefined the Green Lantern Corps for years to come. In this regard, we highly doubt 2008 will be able to measure up.
    Marvel Comics

    Civil War was still numero uno in every reader's mind coming into 2007. Delays might have pushed the book's climax from November to February, but the wait was well worth it. Fans finally received their answer as to which side would win the war over registration. After surrendering to authorities, Captain America was gunned down in one of the most shocking moments of the year. Even better than Civil War #7 was the follow-up issue titled The Confession. This issue capped off the broken relationship between Cap and Iron Man to great effect, and was a fitting finale to such a major event.

    Civil War radically altered the scope of the Marvel universe and ts various books. As part of the new Initiative line, Marvel introduced books like The Order, The New Warriors, and Avengers: The Initiative that explored the layout of their post-Civil War landscape. New Avengers and Mighty Avengers gave us teams at opposite ends of the spectrum. Somehow, the Initiative even turned the formerly boring Thunderbolts into one of Marvel's best series overnight.



    While most Marvel characters benefited from Marvel's new status quo, one hero who suffered in 2007 was Spider-Man. Marvel kicked off the "Back in Black" event in February with the shooting of Aunt May. Wracked with guilt, Peter donned his old black costume and began a quest for revenge. While "Back in Black" started out well enough, it quickly wore out its welcome thanks to poor pacing and a few lackluster tie-ins. This event lead right into "One More Day", an event that has enjoyed anything but a warm reception. By all accounts "One More Day" looks to wipe Peter Parker's marriage out of existence. Regardless of how excited readers may be for next year's "Brand New Day" event, that's a hard pill to swallow.

    2007 was also the year Hulk returned to Earth. Furious over the betrayals by his former allies, Hulk and his Warbound invaded New York and imprisoned dozens of superheroes. When the wreckage cleared, Tony Stark and the Initiative prevailed, and Hulk's fate was unclear. While entertaining to an extent, this Hulk-sized event failed to make the same level of impact on Marvel's books that Civil War did last year.



    Much more interesting than Hulk's vendetta was the revelation that the shape-shifting Skrulls have invaded the Marvel universe. The New Avengers discovered that Elektra was actually a Skrull, and this kicked off a wave of paranoia and mistrust. Who amongst the hero community can be trusted? Besides Elektra, Black Bolt stood revealed, and we can only imagine how many more traitors will make themselves known in the months leading up to Secret Invasion.
    Image, Dark Horse, & Small Press

    Like usual, the smaller publishers managed to hold their own with their respective slates of quality titles. Dark Horse enjoyed a major mainstream hit with Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 8. Other DH favorites like the BPRD series, The Goon, and Conan helped further the publisher's stellar reputation in 2008.



    Image was assisted in no small part by Robert Kirkman, whose creator-owned series Invincible, The Walking Dead, and Astounding Wolf-Man all proved to be top sellers for the company. As usual, though, readers were often left wondering when the next issue in each series would actually ship. Other Image notables included Casanova, Dynamo 5, and the popular mini-series Phonogram.

    Dynamite gained a major foothold in the market thanks to a slew of major acquisitions. When Garth Ennis' The Boys proved to be too risque for DC, Dynamite chose to continue the series. Their Lone Ranger series proved to be one of the best of the many cowboy books available. Archaia Studios also saw a very successful 2007, thanks to the growing Mouse Guard empire and the stellar mini-series The Killer.
    The Books of 2007


    While the Best of Awards (which will go live tomorrow) are meant to analyze the best and brightest the industry had to offer in 2007, this section is meant to look at which 10 books were the most influential during that time. Note that the best comic and most influential comic may be two very different things. We're bending the rules a little bit this year, as many of these choices aren't series per se, but rather events and major storylines. Given the increasing focus on big events this year, it's nearly impossible to confine ourselves to individual books anymore.

    52 - DC Comics
    Various | Various

    DC's first successful weekly comic hit the stratosphere in 2007, leaving behind many of the pacing and story problems that hindered it in 2006. With so many comic superstars in one place, including Geoff Johns, Mark Waid, Grant Morrison, Greg Rucka, and Keith Giffen, it was no surprise the series turned out as well as it did. Who would have thought a few years ago that a band of nobodies like Booster Gold and Renee Montoya would be some of the most compelling characters in the DCU? Coming off the the big WWIII climax in Week 50, we were sad to see the series come to a close with Week 52. Countdown's continued presence doesn't help much.



    Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 8 - Dark Horse

    Joss Whedon & Various | Georges Jeanty & Various

    Though it lasted for seven long seasons Joss Whedon fans were crushed when Buffy the Vampire Slayer left the air. Those same fans are extremely fortunate that Whedon loves comic books so much. Buffy: Season 8 picks up more or less where the television series left off. Though Buffy, Xander, and the rest are now confined to the printed page, their adventures are no less entertaining. Even Buffy fas who have never read a comic in their lives had no problem jumping right into the series. A growing number of popular movies, television series, and video games are being adapted for comics these days. Buffy: Season 8 should prove to be a benchmark for these adaptations to live up to.

    Captain America - Marvel Comics
    Ed Brubaker | Steve Epting & Mike Perkins

    We've said it before, and we'll say it again. No comic has a right to succeed so well without its main character like Captain America does. After suffering through much of 2006 with Civil War-related delays, Ed Brubaker rang out the new year with a literal bang, killing Captain America on the steps of a courthouse. With Cap gone, his supporting cast rose to the challenge admirably. Bucky's quest for redemption is compelling, Sharon Carter's tragic secret is heart-breaking, and we can't help but wish Brubaker would make Falcon the new Cap. Regardless of who actually carries the shield next year, we expect Brubaker to continue the past three years of excellence on the book.



    Civil War - Marvel Comics
    Mark Millar | Steve McNiven

    Despite the fact that Civil War was nearly over by the beginning of 2007, no storyline has had such a profound effect on the Marvel's comic lineup this year. Mark Millar's controversial storyline accomplished exactly what it set out to do by making the Marvel universe more dangerous and unpredictable. Marvel's decision to delay the mini-series rather than hire a fill-in artist to replace the talented but overworked Steve McNiven proved to be the right one, as the finished product is one slick-looking comic. Civil War inspired a glut of new and revamped series, everything from the dual Avengers books to Punisher: War Journal to The Order and beyond. We might as well reserve a spot for Civil War in the 2008 list, because we'll still be seeing its ramifications in the future.

    Countdown - DC Comics
    Various | Various

    Speaking of which, hey – it's Countdown!

    [awkward silence]

    Countdown had the unlucky task of following up 52, and it's little wonder DC's second big weekly series hasn't met with the same level of critical success. The lackluster character lineup, substituting Jimmy Olsen and Jason Todd for Black Adam and The Question, certainly doesn't help matters. One area Countdown does outclass its predecessor, though, is its effect on DC's entire line. Few series haven't been touched by the Countdown juggernaut in one way or another. If you want to talk influential comics, it's nearly impossible to ignore Countdown and its many tie-ins. Now that DC has added the phrase "Final Crisis" to the title, its importance is only more obvious.



    X-Men: Messiah Complex - Marvel Comics

    Various | Various

    The X-Men have been overdue for a major crossover event for years now. The '90s were plagued by them, of course, but the '90s were plagued by a lot of bad things. Though Messiah Complex didn't arrive until the very end of October, it instantly rocketed the X-Men to the forefront of the Marvel universe. X-fans who haven't read a comic since the days of the old cartoon returned to see what the fuss was all about, and they were hardly disappointed. Messiah Complex works to make the mutants relevant again, both as a social metaphor and as individual characters. Between this crossover and Astonishing X-Men, Cyclops has suddenly become one of the most popular members of the team, a sharp 180 from years past. Like many of the events in this list, Messiah Complex promises to shake up the status quo in a major way, and hopefully return the X-Men to their former popularity.

    New Avengers - Marvel Comics

    Brian Michael Bendis | Leinil Yu

    Just as Avengers fans were growing used to Brian Michael Bendis' unusual New Avengers squad, Civil War went and shook things up again. Now comprised of underground heroes still fighting the Registration Act, this series has taken on a much darker tone. The real kicker came, however, with the revelation last summer that Skrulls had invaded Earth and were hiding in the superhuman community. Comic readers everywhere now ask themselves who can be trusted. Who in our favorite Marvel series is really a Skrull? These questions will drive the Marvel universe as it steers towards Bendis' Secret Invasion mini-series next year.



    Spider-Man: One More Day - Marvel Comics
    J. Michael Straczynski | Joe Quesada
    Spider-Man fans have some strong opinions on J. Michael Straczynksi's final Amazing Spider-Man story, One More Day. That's probably a sign that Marvel is doing something right. Many fans take issue with what appears to be the central mission of the story – eliminating the marriage of Peter Parker and Mary Jane Watson. These same fans rightly take issue with the fact that One More Day isn't a very fitting conclusion to Straczynski's run, ignoring dangling plot threads in favor a mystical dilemma featuring Mephisto. Still, One More Day has fans talking... a lot. This heavily delayed storyline will lead right into Brand New Day next year, which will see the three Spidey books converge into one semi-weekly series. You may not like it, but One More Day is the biggest thing to level Peter Parker's life since Civil War.

    Green Lantern: The Sinestro Corps War - DC Comics

    Various | Various
    In a year that had previously been dominated by Countdown and the slow buildup to Final Crisis, Geoff Johns shattered every DC reader's expectations with The Sinestro Corps War. As The Empire Strikes Back to Green Lantern: Rebirth's Star Wars, this storyline saw Sinestro form an army of warriors who used fear as a weapon. The 10 part storyline, as well as its surprisingly minimal level of tie-ins, offered one of the most exciting and visceral superhero experiences of the year. Even now its connection to Final Crisis is nebulous, but DC has more than hinted at the greater things to come in 2008 and beyond. The road to Blackest Night starts here, and every self-respecting DC reader should be on board.



    World War Hulk - Marvel Comics
    Greg Pak | John Romita, Jr.

    As Marvel's big marketing push during the central part of 2007, World War Hulk simply can't be ignored. After sending Hulk on a cosmic odyssey in Planet Hulk, Greg Pak brought him crashing back to Earth on a quest for revenge. Many fans took issue with their favorite Marvel characters being pummeled by Hulk all summer long, but few could deny that Hulk looked good while doing it. The aftermath of this war has spawned what can only be considered an entire line of Hulk-related comics. Several Aftersmash mini-series will hit the stands in the coming months. Three ongoing Hulk series will be available next year, though whether Bruce Banner is a part of any of them is still anyone's guess at this point.
    The News of 2007: Part One


    2007 was a mad rush of big storylines and important revelations, and we can't blame you if you weren't able to keep it all straight. Let's take a journey through the past year and revisit all the major announcements and news developments. For each announcement you can click the "full story" link to be visit our relevant coverage on the subject.

    January

    Fairly low key by usual standards, January was perhaps most notable for our lengthy discussion with Fables creator Bill Willingham (full story). Amazons Attack loomed large at the time, and our interview with writer Will Pfeifer shed some light on the first big event of 2007 (full story). Civil War was also winding down to a close in January, so we graded the entire scope of the event in our handy and comprehensive "Civil War Report Card" (full story). We don't give A's for effort.

    News of another big event was quickly brewing. DC revealed the first of the infamous teaser images for Countdown, which readers are still picking apart today (full story). In addition, they released further details about World War III as part of their 52 series (full story).



    February

    February was a big month for the New York Comic Con, which is covered in more detail on the following page. Toy Fair proved to be another big event for New York, with major manufacturers showing off their goods for the new year (full story).

    This month also saw the release of the first issue of The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger Born, an adaptation of Stephen King's popular fantasy series of novels. As popular as they are, many comic fans have never been exposed to The Dark Tower books, which led us to draft an informative Reader's Guide to the series (full story). February marked the release of the first issue of Jason Aaron's new Vertigo series, Scalped. You can look here for our interview with the up and coming writer. We also spent some time talking with Mark Waid as part of our regular series of 52 interviews (full story).

    March

    March will be remembered for nothing if not the death of Captain America. In this feature we take a look back at the life and times of one of the greatest superheroes in comics. Even Stephen Colbert had a few truthy words to say about the matter (full story). Marvel also dropped the first details regarding X-Men: Endangered Species (full story) and World War Hulk (full story). In the first of what would prove to be many digital comics-related announcements over the course of the year, Top Cow announced a deal that would make their comic available over the web (full story). Buffy was another hot topic in March, as her new series was just hitting stands. After providing another handy Reader's Guide (full story), we sat down and discussed Season 8 with Joss Whedon (full story). We also started to question the fate of the Ultimate line of comics and whether they were necessary any longer in a Brain Trust debate (full story). Time has shown that not all of our predictions were inaccurate.



    April

    Marvel started off April's news by unveiling a poster of Hulk's "Hit List" during World War Hulk (full story). They then raised the feeble hopes of movie fans everywhere by creating a contest allowing one lucky winner to become a part of a new marvel movie (full story). And in a strange turn of events, scientists reportedly discovered actual Kryptonite (full story). Superman was immediately put on notice.

    Back in Black was still raging in the Spider-Man books at the time, so we gathered the Spidey editors for a roundtable discussion on the present and future prospects for Peter Parker's troubled life (full story). JLA and JSA were both embroiled in "The Lightning Saga," so we talked to Brad Meltzer about the crossover and his plans for the remaining few issues of his JLA run (full story).

    May

    To coincide with the upcoming movie, Marvel released details about its Avengers/Transformers crossover (full story). They also announced what was possibly the most demanded hardcover collection at the time, the Captain America Omnibus (full story). In one of many announcements regarding licensed properties, IDW Comics announced a comic book sequel to the movie Scarface (full story).

    Meanwhile, May saw the end of 52 and the beginning of Countdown over at DC. You can read our cumulative series review of 52 here and our Reader's Guide for Countdown here. Dan Didio also stopped by to discuss Countdown in more detail (full story). By this point in the year we were already growing wary of more event comics, and we discussed whether enough was enough in another volume of the Brain Trust (full story).



    June

    Marvel's new series The Champions was almost derailed by legal troubles relating to the name trademark, but Marvel finally compromised by changing the name to The Order (full story). Wizard World Philadelphia revealed the new writers behind JLA and The Flash (full story). In another major acquisition for the toy maker, McFarlane toys announced they would soon be producing Halo action figures to coincide with the release of the new game (full story).

    The site was nearly inundated with X-Men coverage, as we interviewed Marvel's writers on the death of Sabretooth (full story), the future of the team (full story), and the upcoming Messiah Complex. We also talked to Brian Michael Bendis about the recent Skrull revelations in New Avengers (full story). And finally, we published a World War Hulk Reader's Guide shortly before the first issue hit stands (full story).
    The News of 2007: Part Two


    July

    July was more or less dominated by Sand Diego Comic Con coverage (event index). Marvel started off the month by announcing a renewed focus on their MAX imprint, including the new Foolkiller and Terror, Inc. mini-series (full-story). Marvel also unveiled a mystery cover that was quite obviously part of the sequel to Marvel Zombies (full story). Dynamite joined a long list of publishers adapting video games when they announced their Mercenaries comic, a tie-in to the new game (full story). DC even made an initial foray into online comics with their new website Zuda (full story).

    July was home to a slew of revealing interviews with comic creators. We talked to David Petersen about Mouse Guard (full story), Brian Bendis and Mark Bagley about the latter's departure from Ultimate Spider-Man (full story), and got the early word from Ethan van Sciver on Sinestro Corps (full story). Exclusive debut of final art from the third volume of Ultimates? Yeah, we were all over that (full story).



    August


    If July was SDCC-central, August was all about Wizard World Chicago. More coverage can be found on the following page (Hint: We got to see footage from the Dark Knight (full story). Here at IGN it was Annihilation: Conquest month, as we interviewed the writers behind all four tie-in books - Star-Lord, Quasar, Wraith, and Nova. We also covered some major August developments including Mark Millar's upcoming Fantastic Four run (full story) and Alex Ross' newly revealed Marvel work (full story).

    British readers were outraged when DC announced it would only be publishing Alan Moore's The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Black Dossier in America for the time being(full story). That hasn't stopped copies of the book from trickling across the pond. In other news of chief interest to British readers, Virgin Comics announced a forhcming series starring legendary space hero Dan Dare (full story). Marvel announced that they would be terminating their partnership with the Dabel Brothers after a fairly successful span of months (full story), though Marvel retained ownership rights to many of the Dabel's high profile projects like Anita Blake.

    September

    After the hubbub of the convention season died down, September was a fairly quiet month. Marvel showed off a nifty teaser image featuring the X-Men... Disassembled (full story)!!! DC announced a new hardcover collection of the online Heroes comic strips for those who preferred a more traditional reading experience (full story).

    Green Arrow fans were shocked by the unexpected ending of the Green Arrow/Black Canary wedding, so Judd Winick stopped by to explain just where his story was headed (full story). We also interviewed several creators on their plans for upcoming events, including Secret Invasion and The Resurrection of Ra's al Ghul.



    October

    What's this? A new Captain America (full story)? Less unexpected but more annoying was the announcement of further delays for One More Day (full story), which cause us to complain loudly and repeatedly (full story). We also heard from Geoff Johns regarding Sinestro Corps (full story) and published another Reader's Guide to assist X-men fans in their preparation for the Halloween release of Messiah Complex (full story).

    November

    One of November's biggest announcements was that Marvel was unveiling their own digital comics distribution service (full story). Though not without some kinks, this service represents an interesting step forward for the industry. With World War Hulk finally concluded, we learned new details about new series like Hulk, Incredible Herc, and Skaar Son of Hulk. We also sat down with Gail Simone, whose long-awaited and long-delayed run on Wonder Woman began in November (full story).

    Want a Marvel vs. Capcom 3 fighting game? We do (full story). Though we initially set about describing the ultimate comic book fighting game, we quickly realized a fine-tuned sequel would do. Want to know the crazy part? One of the directors of the upcoming Street Fighter IV game confirmed that he'd love to work on a third installment! Time to start those petitions to Marvel West and Capcom!

    December

    While you hopefully don't need that much help remembering what happened this month, there were a few developments of note. Geoff Johns concluded his epic Sinestro Corps War storyline, and we talked with him to find out what he has planned for the future leading into Blackest Night (full story). While it may seem hard to believe, Brand New Day is almost here, and we discussed Spidey's new lease on life with editor Steve Wacker (full story).
    The Events of 2007


    Comic conventions have been a big part of the industry for years, and they continued to be a major force in 2007. Comic fans flocked to these shows to meet their favorite creators, buy lots of expensive swag, and be first in line to hear all the major announcements. There were plenty of major announcements to be heard this year, particularly at the New York Comic Con, San Diego Comic Con, and Wizard World Chicago. These three events were the defining conventions of 2007, so let's look back and see just what happened during these crazy few days.

    New York Comic Con

    It wouldn't be much of a stretch to call last year's NYCC an unmitigated disaster. Tens of thousands of fans lined up outside the convention hall in the freezing cold, only to be turned away by the city fire marshal because of the overcrowded conditions. This year's event went off much more smoothly, with plenty of room for all the attendees. The cold weather was still an issue, but what else can one expect from New York in February? Though only two years old now, NYCC is quickly becoming an East Coast rival to the massive SDCC. Can nerd turf wars be far behind?

    Plenty of big Marvel news was made available this year. Jeph Loeb gave an early glimpse at his work on the Ultimate line (full story). Daredevil fans learned the first details about Daredevil: End of Days (full story), an ambitious mini-series in the same vein as books like Wolverine: The End. Fans also enjoyed early details about World War Hulk (full story), and a final look at the recently concluded Civil War (full story). For their part, DC began to shift their focus from 52 to the upcoming Countdown (full story).



    San Diego Comic Con

    SDCC is still the biggest comic convention each year. 2007 showed many fans that it might have grown too big. With E3 a shadow of its former self, SDCC has become a haven for pop culture lovers everywhere, not just comic fans.

    As always, SDCC was ripe with movie-related announcements. Jon Favreau thrilled his audience with an early look at footage from Iron Man (full story), which immediately had us frothing at the mouth. Marvel put a spotlight on its Halo: Uprising project (full story), which had fans of the games and of the dynamic duo of Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev very excited. Runaways fans finally received an answer to their loud questioning, as it was revealed that Terry Moore and Humberto Ramos would be replacing Joss Whedon and Michael Ryan at the end of their run... whenever that happens (full story).



    On the biggest stage of the year, Marvel revealed more details about its post-"One More Day" direction for Spider-Man. The creative team of "Brand New Day" was revealed (story #1, story #2), though we vividly recall the room not being packed. What might be the cause? Marvel West was showcasing its upcoming slate of movies, including Iron Man and The Hulk. Oops!

    Along with more revelations about Ultimatum (full story) and The Ultimates 3 (full story), Marvel also dangled a single teaser image in front of X-Men fans. They revealed that Warren Ellis and Simone Bianchi would be the new creative team on Astonishing X-Men (full story). Plenty of other multimedia announcements were made, but we'll let our colleagues tell you about those themselves.



    Wizard World Chicago

    While not causing as much of a ruckus as the other two conventions, WW Chicago was still a big shindig for comic lovers. The highlight of the show for many fans was the unveiling of early footage from The Dark Knight, which Christopher Nolan presented as a thank you gift to the proud citizens of Chicago (full story). Marvel announced a retro-flavored Luke Cage story written and drawn by animator Gendy Tartakovsky (full story). They also revealed that Alex Ross would be returning to the company to draw covers and work on a series that brings the classic WWII Invaders to the present day Marvel universe (full story). Fans of Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch learned that the duo will next be working on Fantastic Four for at least a year (full story). For more Marvel announcements, take a gander at this panel report (full story). DC also dropped a number of smaller details, including the revelation that they're already hard at work on next year's weekly series (full story).
    A Glimpse at 2008


    Comic publishers are rarely willing to wait and catch a breather between their big storylines anymore. Don't expect any downtime in 2008 as some big events wind down to a finish and others only get bigger.

    One of the first big news stories of 2008 will undoubtedly be the identity of the new Captain America. Captain America #34 is slated for January, and we'll finally learn who resides underneath the shiny new costume. While the answer may seem like a no-brainer to some, don't be absolutely sure. Ed Brubaker hasn't rocketed Captain America to the top of the charts by following conventional wisdom.



    Messiah Complex should be wrapping up in a few weeks, and many readers are curious about the status of the X-universe moving forward. The biggest question is if more mutant babies will continue to be born, but only the final chapter can tell us that. We do know that the lineup of X-Men books will be changing significantly. X-Men will be renamed X-Men: Legacy with Mike Carey at the helm. Popular rumor states that New X-Men is getting canceled, to be replaced by newcomers like X-Force and a new Cable solo series. There's also Young X-Men, a series Marvel just recently name-dropped in a press release. With Messiah Complex barely half over, we still have weeks, if not months, before we get answers to these questions.

    Secret Invasion is poised to be Marvel's major event book of 2008, and the tie-ins will start fast and furious leading up to April. Pay close attention to Ms. Marvel and Captain Marvel, as both series appear to be heavily involved in the event. Don't forget about New Avengers, where the Skrull storyline first began, or its sister series Mighty Avengers, which is already taking on a much heavier Skrull influence (as is Avengers: The Initiative). It stands to reason that many clues already exist as to the identity of other Skrull traitors. Any character with a suspicious resurrection story or recent odd behavior is suspect. Start an office pool and see who wins big as more revelations fly this spring.



    Green Lantern is another series to keep a close eye on in 2008. Geoff Johns dropped a variety of clues as to the direction the series will head in leading to Blackest Night in 2009. We know that 4 more Lantern Corps will rise in addition to the three preexisting ones, the first of which appears to be the anger-fueled Red Lanterns. We also know that the body of the Anti-Monitor will be used to power the undead Black Lantern Corps. Remembering our high school lessons on color theory, it seems very possible that a White Lantern Corps can't be far behind. Also pay attention to the Green Lantern Corps series, where characters like Sodom Yat will become a major part of this new and more dangerous DC universe.

    Final Crisis will be arriving around the same time as Secret Invasion, but the two major events appear to be wildly different in most respects. Grant Morrison's epic mini-series is being described as DC's version of Lord of the Rings, which certainly has us intrigued. While Final Crisis will play off of certain developments from Countdown, it appears to be keeping a safe distance from that troubled weekly series. We don't know much else at this point, except for a few clues that can be gleaned from the teaser poster, which promises, "Heroes die. Legends live forever." Apparently someone is going to die, and we expect it'll be a major player in the DCU. Expect Final Crisis to have at least as much of an effect on DC's status quo as Infinite Crisis did in 2006.



    And in a related subject, DC has already promised that another weekly series will follow Countdown when it concludes in May. Very little is known about the new series at this point. Suffice it to say, DC is well aware of the complaints readers have about Countdown, and we assume steps will be taken to account for that. On a somewhat related note, superstar artist Mark Bagley just moved to DC. Might he be helming the weekly series? That would be quite the impressive feat, but if anyone is capable of it, it's Bagley.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    And that's 2007 in a nutshell. It sure was a wild ride, but it doesn't appear that our favorite publishers will be letting us off the coaster anytime soon. We suggest you save all that Christmas money, because you're going to need it. As always, stay tuned to IGN for guidance in what to buy, what to avoid, and what to seal inside a protective diamond case and throw on eBay. It's all in the holiday spirit.

  • #2
    Altas ilustrações trocadas....
    BOSTIL TIL TIL!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Artigo muito bom! Realmente, 2007 (e 2006) foram grandes anos para as HQs!
      Hoje não coleciono só quadrinhos, coleciono fragmentos e memórias da minha vida, coleciono aquilo que nunca mais terei, coleciono o passado e sei que essa coleção não tem preço. - Don Dracula

      Comment


      • #4
        Como essa ÒTIMA era do quadrinhos será lembrada?

        Comment


        • #5
          Pra quem é criança, adolescente e adulto sem noção, prato cheio.

          Pra quem é adulto e não se interessa por super-heróis, explosões e monstrinhos de cara feia, só resta lamentar.

          Super-herói já deu no saco.
          Quadrinhos já deram no saco.
          Mas a criançada curte.
          "AVATAR E ASSINATURA REMOVIDOS POR ULTRAPASSAREM O LIMITE DE 30KB"

          Comment


          • #6
            Postado originalmente por BK
            Pra quem é criança, adolescente e adulto sem noção, prato cheio.

            Pra quem é adulto e não se interessa por super-heróis, explosões e monstrinhos de cara feia, só resta lamentar.

            Super-herói já deu no saco.
            Quadrinhos já deram no saco.
            Mas a criançada curte.
            Que tipo de quadrinhos você ainda gosta, BK? E porque 2007 foi um ano lamentável pra você?

            Comment


            • #7
              Não falaram nada de Astonishing nem de Dark Tower??? Pffff.

              Comment


              • #8
                Postado originalmente por #@®®¡$
                Que tipo de quadrinhos você ainda gosta, BK? E porque 2007 foi um ano lamentável pra você?
                Cara...
                Eu gosto de tanta coisa...
                Gosto de FC, terror, policial, aventura, até de romance eu gosto (não muito, senão pega mal).

                Só que é foda, eu não tenho cabeça pra Marvel/DC/Image e congêneres.
                Sei lá que caralho da porra vocês tem na cabeça pra curtir super-herói bem desenhado mas cujo produto é pra criança e adolescente.
                Acho que vocês são crianças e adolescentes...

                Este ano pra mim foi o pior de toda minha vida porque eu não tive UMA alternativa de gibi pra ler, fora Lobo Solitário e Samurai Executor.
                O que me restava era mangá pra otaku retardado ou super-herói pra marvete/deceneiro igualmente retardado!

                Me restava comprar álbuns caríssimos em gibiterias de viado.

                Sinto falta dos quadrinhos europeus, dos quadrinhos alternativos dos EUA, sinto falta de variedade acessível mas uma variedade PARA ADULTOS. E nisso me refiro aos quadrinhos com roteiro bem feito e não apenas as tralhas idiotas pra moleque.

                Sinto falta de uma revista tipo almanaque.

                Basicamente seria isso.
                "AVATAR E ASSINATURA REMOVIDOS POR ULTRAPASSAREM O LIMITE DE 30KB"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Postado originalmente por BK
                  Postado originalmente por #@®®¡$
                  Que tipo de quadrinhos você ainda gosta, BK? E porque 2007 foi um ano lamentável pra você?
                  Cara...
                  Eu gosto de tanta coisa...
                  Gosto de FC, terror, policial, aventura, até de romance eu gosto (não muito, senão pega mal).

                  Só que é foda, eu não tenho cabeça pra Marvel/DC/Image e congêneres.
                  Sei lá que caralho da porra vocês tem na cabeça pra curtir super-herói bem desenhado mas cujo produto é pra criança e adolescente.
                  Acho que vocês são crianças e adolescentes...

                  Este ano pra mim foi o pior de toda minha vida porque eu não tive UMA alternativa de gibi pra ler, fora Lobo Solitário e Samurai Executor.
                  O que me restava era mangá pra otaku retardado ou super-herói pra marvete/deceneiro igualmente retardado!

                  Me restava comprar álbuns caríssimos em gibiterias de viado.

                  Sinto falta dos quadrinhos europeus, dos quadrinhos alternativos dos EUA, sinto falta de variedade acessível mas uma variedade PARA ADULTOS. E nisso me refiro aos quadrinhos com roteiro bem feito e não apenas as tralhas idiotas pra moleque.

                  Sinto falta de uma revista tipo almanaque.

                  Basicamente seria isso.
                  Agora, do ponto de vista comercial, você acha que tem mercado para sustentar estas publicações (álbuns europeus de FC, policiais,etc) em bancas a um preço acessível ?

                  (clique no link abaixo e saiba como ser assinante do fórum!)
                  http://www.mbbforum.com/mbb/showthread.php?57581-TUDO-MORRE-O-FIM-DO-MBB-Definindo-como-e-quanto-ser%E1-o-nosso-fim-H%E1-salva%E7%E3o



                  "Creio no riso e nas lágrimas como antídotos contra o ódio e o terror."
                  (Charles Chaplin)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Postado originalmente por BK
                    Sinto falta dos quadrinhos europeus, dos quadrinhos alternativos dos EUA, sinto falta de variedade acessível mas uma variedade PARA ADULTOS. E nisso me refiro aos quadrinhos com roteiro bem feito e não apenas as tralhas idiotas pra moleque.

                    Sinto falta de uma revista tipo almanaque.

                    Basicamente seria isso.
                    Você chegou a dar uma olhada naquela Pixel Magazine?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Postado originalmente por Dr.MeiaNoite
                      Não falaram nada de Astonishing nem de Dark Tower??? Pffff.
                      Falaram.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Postado originalmente por D3v0t0 d0 0d!0
                        Agora, do ponto de vista comercial, você acha que tem mercado para sustentar estas publicações (álbuns europeus de FC, policiais,etc) em bancas a um preço acessível ?
                        Sinceridade?
                        Acho que não.
                        Porque uma publicação do tipo que imaginei, popular e a preço acessível, precisaria ter ampla distribuição e consequente grande tiragem.
                        Mais uma seleção de títulos boa e um atrelamento a alguma mídia maior pra levantar a publicação.
                        Só que pra tudo isso é preciso que a editora tenha um staff competente, profissional, dedicado e que viabilize a publicação não apenas na sua parte técnica.

                        Mas como fazer isso quando as editoras contraram moleques tipo o Lopes, Oggh e Elza Keiko que nem a menor experiência editorial possuem?
                        Postado originalmente por #@®®¡$
                        Você chegou a dar uma olhada naquela Pixel Magazine?
                        Cara...
                        Eu não gosto de gibiteria.
                        Não gosto de livraria.
                        Meu negócio é banca. No máximo um sebo.
                        O que eu vi da Pixel foi por acidente, naquelas grandes bancas do Centro de SP. Haviam títulos interessantes, com certeza, mas pagar o que eles pedem pra UMA publicação...
                        Sendo que esta publicação é refugo nacional ou encalhe de material europeu?
                        Tô fora.

                        Eu me sinto completamente rejeitado pelas editoras.
                        Fui alfabetizado pelos quadrinhos, me dediquei a fazer quadrinhos, trabalhei com quadrinhos, lancei vários autores de quadrinhos, licenciei quadrinhos e, portanto, adoro quadrinhos.
                        Mas me desculpem a sinceridade, mas eu estou com 44 anos e não tenho cabeça pra Capitão América, Batman, X-Men e Super Homem.

                        E acho incrível como vocês se interessam em consumir quadrinhos tão retardados quanto esses aí do texto.

                        Sei lá, acho que vocês não se dão valor...
                        Ou se satisfazem com pouco.
                        "AVATAR E ASSINATURA REMOVIDOS POR ULTRAPASSAREM O LIMITE DE 30KB"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Postado originalmente por BK
                          Postado originalmente por #@®®¡$
                          Você chegou a dar uma olhada naquela Pixel Magazine?
                          Cara...
                          Eu não gosto de gibiteria.
                          Não gosto de livraria.
                          Meu negócio é banca. No máximo um sebo.
                          O que eu vi da Pixel foi por acidente, naquelas grandes bancas do Centro de SP. Haviam títulos interessantes, com certeza, mas pagar o que eles pedem pra UMA publicação...
                          Sendo que esta publicação é refugo nacional ou encalhe de material europeu?
                          Tô fora.
                          Entendi. Eu acho a Pixel Magazine com facilidade nas bancas que freqüento, mas eu de fato procuro bancas um pouco maiores. Eu só acho que o conteúdo dela é o mais próximo à premissa de gibis que você diz se interessar.

                          Mas me desculpem a sinceridade, mas eu estou com 44 anos e não tenho cabeça pra Capitão América, Batman, X-Men e Super Homem.

                          E acho incrível como vocês se interessam em consumir quadrinhos tão retardados quanto esses aí do texto.

                          Sei lá, acho que vocês não se dão valor...
                          Ou se satisfazem com pouco.
                          Sabe o que eu acho legal em gibi de super-herói? O fato de ser uma mídia contínua que se constrói em cima dos próprios erros. Eu acho muito interessante quando o Johns, por exemplo, pega um monte de personagens que foram criados à toa nos anos 60 e só foram reutilizados duas vezes e dá uma motivação pra eles existirem. Acho bem legal quando uma mini-série como Crise Infinita pega todos os anos 90 pra criticar, que foram a antítese das histórias de super-heróis dos anos 60 e 70.

                          Mas, de fato, não é pra quem não acompanha. É a vida.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Do meu ponto de vista enquanto leitor de banca ocasional...

                            Não li o texto todo, mas as ilustrações e recapitulações me fizeram lembrar porque deixei de comprar quadrinhos de super-heróis em 2007.

                            Pixel Magazine prometeu mundos e fundos mas depois se tornou uma amarga decepção. A Pixel tinha tudo para se tornar uma editora como a Abril nos tempos da Vertigo, mas depois revelou-se como apenas uma Panini com títulos de "prestígio". Não vimos a volta de Y - The Last Man, nem uma periodicidade decente para Ex Machina. E nada de Monstro do Pântano fora do "Eixo do Mal".

                            A Conrad perdeu muito do fôlego e começou a atrasar/cancelar quase todos seus títulos principais... nem mesmo os mangás resistiram à queda. Falando em mangás, a JBC mais uma vez preferiu a segurança do mundinho otaku (depois de prometer nada menos que 12 grandes lançamentos que no final de grandes não tinham nada), enquanto a Panini perdeu toda a moral comigo lançando títulos censurados e com páginas tapa-buracos preenchidas com pidinhas infames copiadas do Orkut. Francamente, isso não é atitude de editora séria. A Panini é uma editora de moleques.

                            No máximo comprei alguns encadernados com reedições de material antigo. Não vi nada relevante em se tratando de títulos independentes (no máximo as notícias externas sobre o fim de Strangers in Paradise e Spirou). Nada de HQ Nacional popular também - Mauricio jogou a toalha e passou para a microscópica Panini (comparado ao que ele já havia alcançado na Abril e na Globo), e olha que 2007 havia sido alardeado como "o ano da HQ Nacional" pelos autistas da CQB. Pois bem, a coisa ficou tão imobilizada que nem mesmo o Blenq compareceu por aqui durante quase todo o ano... e ainda teve o Yabu se vangloriando de sua carreira de escritor "de sucesso", mais uma vez pisando nos leitores de hq e menosprezando seus "colegas" de desenho. 2007 foi o ano em que a categoria se mostrou mais desunida do que nunca.

                            Ah, e os filmes foram todos umas titicas. Não tenho vergonha nenhuma em admitir isso.

                            Mas esse ano tem tudo para dar certo: vou voltar a comprar quadrinho importado, se Deus quiser a Conrad e a Pixel afundam de vez, finalmente lanço minha hq e o Homem de Ferro provará pra todo mundo que o negócio da Warner é ficar só nos desenhos com bichinhos falantes mesmo.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              2007 foi lamentável:

                              1 - marvel e dc não tiveram nada que prestasse: a única coisa relativamente decente ainda foi o justiceiro do garth pennis, ou seja, nada novo.

                              2 - vertigo: pffffffff. prrrrrrrt. pfllllllllt. spsssssssst. pflll.

                              3 - mangá: a única coisa que presta ainda é o cara do lobo solitário: freeman e samurai executor, tudo mangá com mais de 10 anos.

                              4 - album de luxo: até esses tão piores: continuam caro pra caralho, a revisão e a edição são cada vez piores, as histórias são as mesmas lançadas há 30 anos (monstro do pantano, sandman) e até a conrad tá sentindo a pressao e diminuindo a periodicidade.

                              5 - quadrinho nacional: ia ser o ano do quadrinho nacional, 2007, segundo meu considerado blenq. mestre emir não lançou gibi novo da velta
                              to louco pra ler alguma história nova da traveca doroti.
                              Giovanni Giorgio

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