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  • As 50 maiores mortes das HQs...

    ...segundo a Wizard!

    http://www.wizarduniverse.com/magazi.../005216359.cfm

    50. The Doom Patrol
    (Doom Patrol [vol. 1] #121)
    Comics’ most eccentric superteam died as they lived, voluntarily perishing in exchange for Captain Zahl sparing a fishing village.

    49. Osiris
    (52 #43)
    When demigod Osiris reverts to human form, pseudo-reptile Sobek gobbles him up like an ice cream sundae.

    48. Cerebus
    (Cerebus #300)
    The existential aardvark survived countless adventures…only to fall out of bed and snap his neck like a stupid old woman.

    47. Johnny Cloud
    (DC: The New Frontier #1)
    This 1940s warhorse jumps into a dinosaur’s mouth with two live grenades and goes boom. Take that, Jurassic Park!

    46. John Constantine
    (Hellblazer #170)
    For writer Brian Azzarello’s big finale, Constantine is found as a charred corpse on the floor of an S&M club. That’s one tough obit to spin.

    45. Speedy Ortiz
    (Love and Rockets #23?)
    Caught between the pull of his gangland lifestyle and the needs of his despondent girlfriend Maggie, street soldier Speedy picks door No. 3: suicide.

    44. Superboy/Conner Kent
    (Infinite Crisis #6)
    While trying to save the universe, the ersatz Superman is knuckled up at the hands of a psychotic Superboy-Prime, then perishes in an explosion.

    43. Wesley Dodds
    (JSA Secret Files and Origins #1)
    When scumbag Mordru tried to siphon the whereabouts of Doctor Fate from the Golden Age gasser, Dodds does a Greg Louganis from a Himalayan cliff in order to protect the secret.

    42. The Graysons
    (Batman: Dark Victory #9)
    Their demise at the hands of mafia enforcers via “broken” trapeze ropes—filtered through the lens of artist Tim Sale in a beautifully choreographed sequence—birthed their son’s vigilante future.

    41. Marv
    (Dark Horse Presents #62)
    Lummox Marv’s unjust execution inspired “Death Row Marv,” an action figure situated in an electric chair. (Batteries not included.)

    40. G.I. Joes
    (G.I. Joe #109)
    Acting on misunderstood orders, a S.A.W. Viper cuts down a quartet of captured Joes, quipping, “the body count is rising” in the process. Scumbag.

    39. Captain Marvel
    (Kingdom Come #4)
    Fitting that alleged Superman knockoff Captain Marvel would make up for 60 years of pseudo-plagiarism by pushing Superman out of nuclear harm’s way, killing himself in the process.

    38. Pa Kent
    (All-Star Superman #6)
    To be Superman’s father is to suffer a thousand deaths in film, TV and countless comic incarnations. That writer Grant Morrison could make Jonathan Kent’s umpteenth heart attack feel like the first, tragic time proves some kind of morbid genius.

    37. Supergirl
    (Crisis on Infinite Earths #7)
    To add gravitas to its continuity-clarifying maxiseries, DC execs scrapped the Blue Skirt via an Anti-Monitor blast to the belly during her attempt to save the myriad universes from destruction.

    36. The Spartans
    (300 #5)
    Vastly outnumbered by the Persians, a small cadre of mean Spartan bastards stand their ground and take enemy souls with them in Frank Miller’s bloody symphony of underdog conviction.

    35. Morpheus
    (Sandman #69)
    Determined to thwart Desire’s attempted takeover of the Dreaming, dream weaver Morpheus abandons his ethereal kingdom and invites the guidance of sister Death.

    34. Sung Li aka “Girl One”
    (Top 10 #10)
    When Officer Li psychically senses Commissioner Ultima’s involvement in drug deals, the cornered Ultima blasts Li’s friggin’ guts out in front of the entire squad room of angry cops.

    33. Ogami Itto
    (Lone Wolf and Cub #28)
    At the climax of this classic manga, Itto falls at the sword of rival Retsudo. Fortunately, his infant son is also a skilled sociopath, and immediately avenges him.

    32. Captain America
    (Captain America [vol. 5] #25)
    Escorted into a courthouse, symbol of freedom Cap gets plugged in the head by a sniper, and his newly ventilated melon makes national headlines.

    31. Colossus
    (Uncanny X-Men #390)
    As host for the cure to the Legacy Virus, Colossus sacrifices himself in order to save more of his own kind from the disease that claimed his beloved sister.

    30. Karen Page
    (Daredevil [vol. 2.] #5)
    In her redemptive final act, the drug-addicted porn star intercepts DD’s billy club, hurled by Bullseye, and takes one in the chest for lover Matt Murdock.

    29. Mariko Yashida
    (Wolverine [vol. 2] #57)
    Poisoned by blowfish toxin, Mariko is spared a painful death by dying a violent one courtesy of boyfriend Wolverine’s patented euthanasia “claws.”

    28. Ted Knight
    (Starman [vol. 2] #72)
    Screwing up copy for the last time, the doorknob-dumb newscaster…sorry, wrong Ted. This TK blasts himself into orbit to save his city from the Mist’s doomsday bomb in the ultimate self-sacrifice.

    27. Gwen Stacy
    (Amazing Spider-Man #121/Marvels #4)
    The quintessential blonde bombshell dies after the Green Goblin throws her off a building, a moment re-rendered in lush morbidity by Alex Ross (but does she die from the fall, or from Spidey’s web?).

    26. The Waynes
    (Batman: Year One #1)
    Frank Miller’s rendition of Bruce Wayne’s crucial tragedy was borrowed by “Batman Begins,” right down to Martha’s pearls falling to the wet pavement and the bodies resting in the sign of the Bat-symbol.

    25. Allfather D’Aronique and the Messiah
    (Preacher #24)
    We know morbid obesity is a killer, but never imagined it quite like this: In an escape attempt that goes awry, gelatinous tub of goo Allfather falls from a helicopter and splatters on the ground with all the dignity of a dropped egg. An unfortunate piece of collateral damage? Alleged Jesus descendant Messiah, who was situated directly underneath his rapidly descending blubber. We submit curly fries as Exhibit A, your honor.

    24. Jack Drake and Captain Boomerang
    (Identity Crisis #5)
    Insta-orphan: just add sharp things. Directed to assassinate Tim Drake’s father Jack, vertically challenged Captain Boomerang creeps into the Drake house to sling a projectile at his unarmed target. Only problem: Drake has been warned by Jean Loring and supplied with a gun. Racing home, Robin is forced to listen to his father’s frantic, heartfelt final words on the phone; at the proverbial chime of the gunslinger’s clock, Drake shoots the Captain just as he himself is mortally wounded.

    23. Kraven the Hunter
    (Amazing Spider-Man #294)
    On the heels of such gritty narratives as The Dark Knight Returns, Marvel dipped Spider-Man’s second-string villain into suicidal psychosis for its moody “Kraven’s Last Hunt” crossover. Burying Spidey alive, Kraven dons his costume and prances around fighting crime and groping MJ. Satisfied he had finally gotten the better of his rival, he eats the business end of a shotgun while helpfully lying in a coffin.

    22. Squadron Supreme
    (Squadron Supreme #12)
    As Marvel’s avatars for the Justice League, the Squadron could submerge their superpowered toes in waters the JLA wouldn’t dare address, like disarming the world of its nuclear weapons and forcing their will on puny mortals. At the climax of this limited series, several members are annihilated when former member Nighthawk opposes their plans for a “utopian” dictatorship: The closing panels detail the fallen heroes in the morgue, terminated with broken spines, necks and spirits—a roll call of metahuman genocide.

    21. Terra
    (Tales of the Teen Titans Annual #3)
    Able to manipulate dirt—sort of like a sentient John Deere tractor—Titans member Terra was beloved by fans and heroes alike…until it was revealed that she was a spy for Deathstroke. (Worse, she was a smoker!) Feeling betrayed by her mentor, she brings down a H.I.V.E. lair in a maelstrom of rage, burying herself in the process. The arc turned the teen angst knob to 11, with readers shocked that someone so charming could have blood that ran so cold.

    20. Captain Mar-Vell
    (The Death of Captain Marvel)
    The graphic novel’s title left little to the imagination, but even though readers knew it was coming, the expiration of Mar-Vell still resonated. A former Kree spy who came in from the cold, Mar-Vell adopted Earth as his true home. In a nod to the mortality of his new peers, he develops terminal cancer as a result of exposure to toxic nerve gas. Even enemy Thanos pays his respects, as the Marvel U. helplessly watches one of their own fight a battle he can’t hope to win.

    19. Karate Kid
    (Legion of Super-Heroes [vol. 3] #4)
    Returning from their honeymoon, martial arts expert Val Armorr and wife Princess Projecta encounter opposition from the Legion of Super-Villains on her home planet, Orando. Engaging in fisticuffs with Nemesis Kid, a foe who can adapt powers to defeat any opponent, Val is beaten within an inch of his life. Hoping to die in combat, Val valiantly decides to use his final moments to destroy the instruments that threaten the planet. Unfortunately, Pat Morita wasn’t around to rub his leg inappropriately, and he goes to the great dojo in the sky.

    18. John Hartigan
    (Sin City: That Yellow Bastard #6)
    Desperate to find child abductee-turned-stripper Nancy after a stint in the pen, Detective Hartigan inadvertently leads rival Roark Jr. (aka the eponymous Yellow Bastard) right to her. After Hartigan castrates Junior with his bare hands, he realizes that Roark Sr., a powerful U.S. senator, will be relentless in seeking his vengeance. Rather than risk Nancy’s life again, Hartigan performs the ultimate act of selflessness by blowing his fool brains out. (Granted, we’d go pretty far for Jessica Alba, but c’mon.)

    17. Eric Draven
    (The Crow [vol. 1] #1)
    Death is normally the final word in life, but in the case of James O’Barr’s tragic indie, it’s just the beginning. Shot by a roving gang of punks, Draven is forced to watch his girlfriend get molested and murdered. On the operating table, a crow appears and convinces him to let go, that death is the only way to avenge her. Reborn as the Crow, Draven tracks down his lover’s killers, his murder the catalyst for their own grisly fates.

    16. Tragic Teleporting Aliens
    (Top 10 #8)
    As Jeff Goldblum proved so disgustingly in “The Fly,” messing with teleportation never ends well. Case in point: The mix-up involving a Great Gamer on his Thunder Coach and a humanoid couple on vacation in Alan Moore’s Top 10. When the parties involved collide in a “jump bump,” the Great Gamer and the male survivor find their bodies fused together in a horrifying tangle, and over the course of the issue, the resulting physiological catastrophe claims both their lives in agonizing, emotionally gripping detail.

    15. Sue Dibny
    (Identity Crisis #1)
    Spouses of costumed vigilantes find themselves under constant duress from vengeful assailants, but rarely do they ever actually get caught in the crossfire. Unfortunately, preggers Sue Dibny is the exception: Targeted by Jean Loring after Loring shrunk to the size of an ant to fit inside her brain, Dibny suffers a fatal aneurysm. The tragic affair kicked off DC’s “event” crossover, and sent husband Elongated Man into a downward spiral of grief…until 52, when they reunited in the afterlife as ghosts, Swayze-style.

    14. Gertrude Yorkes
    (Runaways #18)
    Wrinkled old creepos dying may not be a tragedy, but sarcastic, caustic teenagers? Though we wish some of them dead, we swear: We didn’t mean Gertrude. The laconic dinosaur-wrangler intervenes in a truly selfless manner when a knife meant for beau Chase is plunged into her stomach instead. Despite hints that she’d be an integral part of the Marvel U. for years to come (it was teased that she would one day lead the Avengers!), fate—in the form of writer Brian K. Vaughan—had other plans.

    13. The Joker
    (The Dark Knight Returns #3)
    For decades, observers wondered why Ears McGee never just grabbed that scrawny neck of the Joker’s and squeezed, leaving his rehabilitation to the devil. In Frank Miller’s revisionist take on the character, Batman himself ponders exactly that. But when the moment of truth comes, he can bring himself only to break his rival’s neck, paralyzing him. Exasperated at Batman’s humanity—and likely not looking forward to a lifetime of pooping in a colostomy bag—the Joker completes the spinal revolution and shuts his own lights off permanently.

    12. The Mist II
    (Starman #4)
    In the grand tradition of the Hatfields and McCoys, both the original Starman and Mist birthed offspring who would continue their longstanding feud. After the Mist II (aka Kyle) assassinates fledgling Starman David Knight, brother of Jack and son of Ted, Jack vows revenge. Battling in the skies over Opal City, Jack impales Kyle with his cosmic rod and fries him with stellar energy, telling the villain, “I may not have liked my brother…but I loved him!” Bonus pathos—after learning of Kyle’s death, the original Mist and his daughter Nash go bananas!

    11. Blue Beetle
    (Countdown to Infinite Crisis)
    Few heroes appear as ignoble at first glance as Ted Kord, a bug-eyed, third-string hero with all the toy shelf cache of a Mr. T figure. But during his investigation into billionaire entrepreneur Maxwell Lord—and his subsequent discovery that Lord was spying on every superhuman on the planet—he displayed poise and heroism beyond his goofball reputation. Glaring unwaveringly into Lord’s face, he sneers defiantly as his captor executes him with a single gunshot to the head.

    10. Milo Garret
    (100 Bullets #36)
    With a face swathed in bandages, ornery P.I. Milo Garret didn’t need much prodding from the mysterious Agent Graves to take a firearm and seek vengeance on his assailants. But true to the nature of Brian Azzarello’s hard-boiled dialogue and seedy scenarios, Garret digs too hard and too long for answers, crossing paths with all the wrong people along the way. Eventually, he finds himself staring at the business end of a gun, which splinters his face and leaves him looking to God for the rest of the pieces to his pulp puzzle.

    9. Kid Miracleman
    (Miracleman #15)
    His mind warped by virtual reality experiments, Kid Miracleman morphed from an affable advocate for justice in the 1950s to a full-blown sociopath in the 1980s. (Note to all: Do NOT let Alan Moore be your day planner.) Desperate to stop his homicidal rampage in London, Miracleman and friends attack with everything they’ve got, including a steel girder, which Warpsmith teleports directly through the madman’s head and chest. As the Kid lay dying in human form, Miracleman comforts him in his final moments…then finishes the job.

    8. Jean Grey
    (Uncanny X-Men #137)
    Forget about her countless resurrections and myopic motivations: When
    X-Men staple Jean Grey first perished, it was a kick in the gut to the fandom collective. Consumed by the overwhelming power of the Phoenix, Grey eventually went mad and morphed from model heroine to a ravager of planets, killing millions in the process. Regaining her sanity long enough to comprehend the enormity of her actions, Grey picks a fight with the X-Men to weaken her immense power, then commits suicide as lover Scott Summers watches in horror. (Of course, this was all retconned out when it was later revealed that the Phoenix Force was a separate entity, but that doesn’t negate the power of Jean’s original demise.)

    7. Rorschach
    (Watchmen #12)
    “Complex” doesn’t even begin to describe the disturbed mind of Walter Kovacs, better known as the violent detective Rorschach. After discovering that mental giant Adrian Veidt (aka Ozymandias) orchestrated a faux alien invasion in order to unify the world’s superpowers and stop a possible nuclear holocaust—while still killing millions in the process—Kovacs refuses to adhere to his allies’ mandate that the secret be kept. Knowing his conviction to the truth no matter the consequences, he begs Doctor Manhattan to kill him, preferring his extinction to the thought of insulting his integrity.

    6. Elektra Natchios
    (Daredevil #181)
    A trained protégé of the mysterious Hand ninja army, Elektra could usually handle her business, but not even a flying guillotine choke could overcome the sheer ruthlessness of Daredevil rival Bullseye. Eager to prove his worth as a Kingpin-approved assassin, the mad marksman, after delivering a brutal beating, uses Elektra’s own sais to run her through like a pig on a stake. Crawling home to Matt Murdock, she dies in his arms as his neighbors look on, a bloody symbol for Murdock’s thwarted pursuit of happiness.

    5. Invisible Man
    (League of Extraordinary Gentlemen [vol. 2] #5)
    Alternating obscene brutality with a kind of socialite’s charm, the brutish Mister Hyde was very displeased with the Invisible Man’s “uncivil” treatment of League cohort Miss Murray. After smashing Griffin’s bones, Hyde does the prison daddy shuffle on his rear end…then calmly sits down for dinner. As Hyde and friends feast, blood slowly materializes on his clothes and on the tablecloth as if from a broken ballpoint pen, visible to Hyde’s horrified allies now that its prior host has expired in a nearby room.

    4. Ben Parker
    (Amazing Fantasy #15/Ultimate Spider-Man #4-#5)
    The death of a loved one is almost requisite for budding superheroes, cutting a path paved in moral integrity and honor. But most tragedies are the result of failing health or violent acts that the protagonist was unable to stop. Not so with Spider-Man: Arrogantly failing to capture a thief, Peter Parker is shocked to learn that the escaped fugitive killed his beloved Uncle Ben only moments later. The scene—crucial in the 1960s, and rendered with unparalleled pathos by Brian Bendis in the 21st century—remains a telling example of Marvel’s complex, human icons, just as capable of catastrophic misjudgments as any of us.

    3. Jason Todd
    (Batman #428)
    The stunt was pure P.T. Barnum: At an appointed time, readers of DC’s “Death in the Family” narrative could dial a 900 number and vote on whether bratty, reformed street punk Jason Todd would live or be the latest casualty of the Joker’s brand of mayhem. Though he was generally loathed as the newest Robin, DC must have been taken aback by the verdict—fans wanted to see the little bastard snuffed. The homicidal Clown Prince of Crime beats Todd into a bloody heap of spandex with a crowbar, then blows the Boy Wonder to bits for the punch line. Parents began working overtime to afford the psychotherapy bills—not only did the wee ones witness the violent death, they sanctioned it.

    2. Barry Allen
    (Crisis on Infinite Earths #8)
    For its first major crossover event, DC swore that its Crisis would have serious consequences. But not even the most jaded fan believed that the publisher would sacrifice longtime DC mainstay the Flash in the process. Deemed a wild card due to his ability to travel between alternate universes, the Anti-Monitor imprisons Allen in the antimatter universe of Qward. Freeing himself, he uses his super-speed to destroy the Monitor’s equipment, pushing his acceleration to unheard-of levels against power-draining antimatter. The exertion is too much, and Allen dies the quintessential hero’s death, sacrificing himself to save countless others.

    1. Superman
    (Superman [vol. 2] #75
    As a near-deity, Kal-El has scarcely been afforded tests of mettle that truly pushed him to his upper limits. But when the alien Doomsday begins a rampage through Metropolis—spewing collateral damage and routing any heroes who attempt to intervene in the process—Big Blue’s reign as champion ass-kicker takes a serious sabbatical. A being of pure rage and single-minded power, Doomsday pummels the Man of Steel like Muhammad Ali taking on a Girl Scout. Bloodied and broken, Superman refuses to take even a single step back. And when all is said and done, when his battered Kryptonian system finally shuts down, he stops breathing only when he’s secure in the knowledge that Doomsday has been defeated.

    The blockbusting scuffle finally proved that Superman’s heroism, his tireless defense of humanity, was never the result of his physical superiority and alien origins. It came from his character. The fans holding those pages—some of whom bore black armbands on the evening news, like a relative had died—mourned the loss of the greatest superhero who ever lived.

  • #2
    Capitão Marvel do Starlin em 20°?

    NEXT!

    Comment


    • #3
      Gwen Stacy atras de Sue Dibny????

      Luigy
      LARANJA, É A COR DA INSANIDADE!


      Ja Visitou o Agenda Metal Hoje? www.agendametal.com.br

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: As 50 maiores mortes das HQs...

        Postado originalmente por Supergirl


        41. Marv
        (Dark Horse Presents #62)
        Lummox Marv’s unjust execution inspired “Death Row Marv,” an action figure situated in an electric chair. (Batteries not included.)

        .



        16. Tragic Teleporting Aliens
        (Top 10 #8)
        As Jeff Goldblum proved so disgustingly in “The Fly,” messing with teleportation never ends well. Case in point: The mix-up involving a Great Gamer on his Thunder Coach and a humanoid couple on vacation in Alan Moore’s Top 10. When the parties involved collide in a “jump bump,” the Great Gamer and the male survivor find their bodies fused together in a horrifying tangle, and over the course of the issue, the resulting physiological catastrophe claims both their lives in agonizing, emotionally gripping detail.
        eu tenho esse boneco do Marv!


        a do top 10 é muito, muito triste.

        Comment


        • #5
          A melhor morte foi a do Superman?

          Nhé.

          Ignoraram o Ben Reilly. Puta mundo injusto meu!

          Comment


          • #6
            Ben Parker em 4º?

            Gwen em 27º?

            NÃO tem Ben Reilly?

            Fala muito sério, Leitão!

            Comment


            • #7
              Boa lista. Concordo em grande parte.

              Comment


              • #8
                Os três primeiros foram muito bem merecidos!!!
                [

                Comment


                • #9
                  Postado originalmente por DarthdeGroot
                  Boa lista. Concordo em grande parte.
                  Com o relator

                  (clique no link abaixo e saiba como ser assinante do fórum!)
                  http://www.mbbforum.com/mbb/showthread.php?57581-TUDO-MORRE-O-FIM-DO-MBB-Definindo-como-e-quanto-ser%E1-o-nosso-fim-H%E1-salva%E7%E3o



                  "Creio no riso e nas lágrimas como antídotos contra o ódio e o terror."
                  (Charles Chaplin)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A morte do Rorschach foi muito foda, mas detestei por ele ter morrido.

                    E a morte do Superman é uma merda que nem deveria estar em primeiro lugar.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Quase todos já estão vivos de novo, então...
                      Maxx
                      "Vencer não é tudo, mas perder é pior que nada." (Charlie Brown)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Não citaram nenhuma das 5 mortes do Magneto. Sacanagem.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Postado originalmente por Desmond
                          E a morte do Superman é uma merda que nem deveria estar em primeiro lugar.
                          Conta mais pelo evento. E nunca, nunca deveria estar a frente da Gwen Stacy e da Supergirl em Crise nas Infinitas Terras.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Se for somente por Superman#75 eu concordo que não deveria estar em primeiro, mas se avaliarmos a história completa, só World Without Superman mais do que merece o primeiro lugar.

                            Não conheço nenhuma história que explorou a morte de um super-herói tão bem quanto essa.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              33. Ogami Itto
                              (Lone Wolf and Cub #28)
                              At the climax of this classic manga, Itto falls at the sword of rival Retsudo. Fortunately, his infant son is also a skilled sociopath, and immediately avenges him.

                              32. Captain America
                              (Captain America [vol. 5] #25)
                              Escorted into a courthouse, symbol of freedom Cap gets plugged in the head by a sniper, and his newly ventilated melon makes national headlines.

                              31. Colossus
                              (Uncanny X-Men #390)
                              As host for the cure to the Legacy Virus, Colossus sacrifices himself in order to save more of his own kind from the disease that claimed his beloved sister.
                              Puts... a morte tosca do Colossus, que foi uma das coisas mais sem graça dos mutantes em anos, equivale a suposta morte da Mary Jane nas mãos do Howard Mackie.

                              O pior é que essa morte tosca ficou na frente da morte do Capitão América e a do Itto Ogami.

                              Comment

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